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Archive | Hearing Impairment

Communication Difficulties

The inability to use speech to communicate may be very limiting!  A person without a voice may find themselves unable to express their choices, interact socially, or obtain their basic needs and wants.  They may feel closed off from the world in many ways.  Most of us usually utilize speech, facial expressions, gestures, eye contact, writing, and typing when we are trying to communicate.

 

Since we are a speech-language clinic- we embrace communication however it manifests, in addition to a formal means of aided communication (e.g. use the sign for “bathroom”, “eat” and “drink”, tap on a person’s shoulder to get their attention, etc). You see communication itself is a fundamental characteristic of humanity.

By on August 18, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are

Aprax…huh??

If someone is suffering from Apraxia, they already know what words they want to say, but at times their brains may have difficulty coordinating the muscle movements necessary to say all the sounds in the words they want to use.

As a result, they may say something completely different or make up words (e.g., “micken” or “chicken” for “kitchen”).

The person may recognize the error and try to attempt to say the word again—sometimes they may even get the word right, but sometimes saying something else entirely. This situation may become quite frustrating for the person, to say the least.

Individuals with apraxia may show these signs or symptoms:

-difficulty imitating and producing speech sounds, marked by speech errors such as sound distortions, substitutions, and/or omissions
-inconsistent speech errors
-groping of the tongue and lips to make specific sounds and words
-slow speech rate
-impaired rhythm and prosody (intonation) of speech
-better automatic speech (e.g., greetings) than purposeful speech
-inability to produce any sound at all in severe cases

By on August 17, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are

Supply and Demand

We get it, we really do… On your end of the receiver, you hear a busy signal or a voicemail greeting asking you to leave a message. On our end of the receiver, we are fielding phone calls from insurance companies, doctors offices, hospitals, patients, state agencies and more. Each day we are handling more and more phone calls involving everything from new regulatory demands to updated prescription information, as well as concerns from sick patients, and billing issues—and lately, as our practice grows (specifically the increase in our clinical staff) we are hearing from more and more patients regarding our appointment availability.

Supply and Demand… There are only some many of us available at any one time to answer the telephones as well as interact in person with each of our patients or caregivers. We are not complaining… We love the additional work and the additional responsibilities, it tells us that we are clearly doing something right. What we are doing is asking for a little bit of patience. If you do get a voicemail greeting asking you to leave a message or our receptionist tells you that all staff is currently busy could you please hold, or if you could please leave us a message, please do just that. We pride ourselves in returning all messages within 24 hours. If you ask us to call you back, we will… That’s a promise..

By on August 16, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are

Back-to-School Tips from Miss Rachel!

Welcome back to another school year!  Welcome back to waking up early, following a morning routine, fitting in homework, sports, chores and everything else life brings!

For many kids, managing time and following a routine is nearly impossible.  Their brains are still developing this higher level thinking skill (Executive Function).  In order to help them be successful, sometimes we need to change the environment.  Changing simple things around the house can create great changes in children.  Throughout the year we will provide some tips for helping with time management and organization at home and school.

For now, start with compassion!

Let your child know you understand how painful it must be to struggle with getting things done.  It is not his/her fault they may struggle with time management, it involves the wiring in the brain.  Let them know you will work together on strategies to help him/her and…THE WHOLE FAMILY!   Mentioning that the whole family will be working together on this may help take some of the stress from your child.

Keep in mind: You can’t do what you can’t do.  Your child isn’t an adult yet.  Be patient.  We’re all in this together!

Adapted from “50 Tips to Help Students Succeed” by Marydee Sklar
#NotYourAverageClinic #NotYourAverageClinicians

By on August 15, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are

So what is it? Signing or talking?

Hearing is often associated with speech in that initial communication and hence understanding, arises primarily from learning spoken language through listening. This is why speech therapy is a must for people with hearing impairment as well as complete involvement from the child’s family to help facilitate that child’s development.  However, we need to remember that one size does not fit all.

I am a big believer in developing the auditory and oral (spoken) skills of children with who have a hearing loss but I also feel that there is room for sign language if needed.  I am a realist. I do not think that one approach is the answer. One of the most frequent questions I am asked concerning the development of a child with a hearing loss is if their child learns sign language while trying to teach them to “learning to listen”, will that prohibit them from developing their auditory and oral skills. I tell them the answer is not so simple. Many variables come into play and there is no clear cut answer. My experience with teaching the deaf and providing services for children with hearing losses has shown me that the child will decided what is the easiest way to communicate is. I believe that if the child is implanted early enough during the first year of their life, the chances are that using sign language will not be an option, since these children often develop the necessary auditory skills to learn how to speak. On the flip side, I have seen many children who have were implanted later on or were aided with hearing aids and their preferred choice of communication is using sign or both. Each child is different and like I stated before, their choice of communication is based upon many variables.

In my practice I work with a range of children and adults who have a hearing impairment. Some have developed the skills to communicate successfully verbally, while others due to late implantation or hearing aid fitting, are trying to develop their auditory/oral skills but prefer to use sign as their primary mode of communication. I try to educate my families and let them know that communication is the ultimate goal. Do I support teaching child and adults to develop their auditory/oral skills to their fullest potential, of course I do, but I also support development of communication in any means possible.

By on September 19, 2011 in Hearing Impairment