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Power of the Whiteboard- Family Time Management Tool

Use of a whiteboard is great support for getting tasks completed.  They keep a to-do list in sight and can help with productivity and fewer family conflicts.

 

– Placement is key

– keep it in sight where everyone will walk past it often and one that you can put away when guests come over

– Assign every family member his or her own section or color marker

– List in your section what you need and want to do on that day or weekend

– Estimate spaces of time to spend on each task

– Visually represent that space of time with a small circle to resemble the face of an analog clock. For example, if an activity will take an hour, color the whole circle, if it will take 15 minutes, color in one fourth of the circle etc. So if an activity or event will take two and a half hours, you would draw two circles completely filled in, followed by a circle filled in halfway.

– After you complete a task, cross it off.

This helps everyone else in the family see what each person needs to do and what they have completed.

– Extra bonus: This whiteboard could also be used to monitor the status of homework, without constant nagging.

– Give praise when the work gets done!

– If it isn’t getting done, avoid going to the yelling mode, instead breathe deep, pause and remember task initiation- just getting started- is an executive skill many children struggle with.

– Suggestion: Say to your child “Hey, I was walking past the whiteboard and noticed you haven’t started your homework. What can I do to help you get started? Or Is there anything I can do to help you get started?” Maybe your child is confused and needs clarification before they feel they can get started. This could help clear that up.

– Avoid using the board like a parents list for the child or other family members. Everyone in the family should be writing and checking off their own list, even if you might be assisting with adding items to your child’s list. This is how independent time-management skills develop! #CognitionCorner #MissRachel #NotYourAverageClinicians

By on August 23, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are

Giving Back

Donations are essential in order for “The Shade Tree” to continue their mission. Clothing, toys and other item donations can be dropped off at 1 West Owens, North Las Vegas NV 89030 (11am-7pm, 7 days a week. Please follow the signs to the upper lot).

 

The following items are listed on Shade Tree’s website as items they may need:

 

* School uniforms (male & female, all sizes) – Khaki pants, navy blue shirts, white button down shirt/blouse
* Paint easels
* Paintboards
* Music – classical
* Medicine – Cold & Flu, Tylenol, Children’s Benadryl
* Bathroom towels

Providing you the means to achieve, We’re #NotYourAverageClinic

By on August 22, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are

Reading Hacks for Parents at Home

Of course reading aloud to an tiny baby is much different than reading to a tiny preschooler. With a baby, you probably won’t make it through to the end of the book. Your baby is going to want to hold the book, chew on it, lick the cover or even try turning pages.

 

-Make reading together a close cuddly time. Reading before bed may be the perfect time to hold your baby on your lap and cuddle together while you read.

-Don’t worry about reading a book start to finish. It is great if you’re able to, but if your child wants to stop and hold or chew on the book, that is okay too. That is another way infants take in information about their world. Let them touch, smell, feel and see.

-Point out and name pictures. Later ask your baby to find the “cow”, “horse”, etc., when you point to it.

-Increase the length and complexity of books as your child shows interest. By about one year of age, some babies will enjoy hearing a short book with a plot.

By on August 21, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are

Communication Difficulties

The inability to use speech to communicate may be very limiting!  A person without a voice may find themselves unable to express their choices, interact socially, or obtain their basic needs and wants.  They may feel closed off from the world in many ways.  Most of us usually utilize speech, facial expressions, gestures, eye contact, writing, and typing when we are trying to communicate.

 

Since we are a speech-language clinic- we embrace communication however it manifests, in addition to a formal means of aided communication (e.g. use the sign for “bathroom”, “eat” and “drink”, tap on a person’s shoulder to get their attention, etc). You see communication itself is a fundamental characteristic of humanity.

By on August 18, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are

Aprax…huh??

If someone is suffering from Apraxia, they already know what words they want to say, but at times their brains may have difficulty coordinating the muscle movements necessary to say all the sounds in the words they want to use.

As a result, they may say something completely different or make up words (e.g., “micken” or “chicken” for “kitchen”).

The person may recognize the error and try to attempt to say the word again—sometimes they may even get the word right, but sometimes saying something else entirely. This situation may become quite frustrating for the person, to say the least.

Individuals with apraxia may show these signs or symptoms:

-difficulty imitating and producing speech sounds, marked by speech errors such as sound distortions, substitutions, and/or omissions
-inconsistent speech errors
-groping of the tongue and lips to make specific sounds and words
-slow speech rate
-impaired rhythm and prosody (intonation) of speech
-better automatic speech (e.g., greetings) than purposeful speech
-inability to produce any sound at all in severe cases

By on August 17, 2017 in Autism Treatment, Cognitive Therapies, Feeding & Swallowing Therapies, General, Health Insurance 101, Hearing Impairment, Philanthropy, Resources, Speech Therapy, Uncategorized, Videos, Voice Disorders, What to Expect, Who We Are
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